Academics

Summer College students may choose from a selection of specialty tracks designed to enrich their exposure to major and minor courses of study. Students designating a track will benefit from additional contact with university departments outside of class. Examples of activities may include field trips, meeting with department faculty, and attendance at special events.

Departments are still reviewing their summer offerings, so expect that this list of tracks will continue to expand through the end of January.

Alternatively, Summer College students can build their own track by choosing two courses from our list of elective courses without the additional benefits of selecting a track.

Please note: Some tracks are only available in either June or July session.

Earn humanities and social science general education credit and explore possible majors/minors while thinking about how we build a more just and inclusive society.

Experiential learning: Possible field trips include National Civil Rights Museum and the local Burns-Belfry Museum and Multicultural Center. Talk with faculty involved in the Prison to College Pipeline program, UM Slavery Research Group, McLean Institute for Community Development, and the Center for Population Studies. Engage in a service learning project. Available in both summer sessions.

All students in this track will choose:

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

G ST 201. Women, Gender, and Society. This interdisciplinary course draws from such areas as sociology, history, political science, communications and literature. Students will examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods.  The class will analyze how markers of one’s identity besides gender, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability, includes one’s experiences in culture.  

AAS 202: African American Experience II. This course is a multidisciplinary study of the African American experience using the study of culture and the arts as a major focus. Students will survey the events and social forces that have come to define contemporary African American life. We will study a diverse mix of academic and popular texts, from classic works to contemporary additions, autobiographies to ethnographies, essays to documentary film. Far-reaching topics such as the impact of employment and black family structures, what black hair styles reveal about the complex relationship between African Americans and whites; and how rap music represents both freedom of expression and police repression will all be explored.

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. One theme of the course is exploring how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges are particularly important in our history for they mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question. 

All students in this track will choose:

BUS 101: Business for a Better World
In 2017, the United Nations Global Compact produced a call to action to business leaders to tackle social, environmental, and social contract issues with sustainable development goals, with the conclusion that "Business leaders need to strike out in new directions to embrace more sustainable and inclusive economic models." This course supports this call to action by exploring the importance of sustainability, opening restrictions to market access, and redeveloping trust between business and society. Available July session.

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics
The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills.

Students in this track will receive intensive instruction in Chinese. Each student will be assigned to an instructional level appropriate to their language proficiency. Eligible students who complete the program will receive college credit in Mandarin Chinese. Available July only.

Whether you wish to pursue the ABET/CAC-accredited B.S. of Computer Science degree through our School of Engineering or the B.A. of Computer Science through the College of Liberal Arts, this track will give you an introductory background in computer science as well as electives that will support your success in pursuing careers in this field.Available both sessions.

All students in this track will choose:

CSCI 111: Computer Science - Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

Elective Course (Choose 1 course below):

ISS 125: Introduction to Intelligence Studies 
Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers. Available June session only.

MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

PHIL 103 Logic: Critical Thinking
This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction, and induction.

Gain a fresh understanding of crime and criminal justice in the United States and abroad through the courses offered in this track and explore areas of possible emphasis within Criminal Justice Studies including homeland security, law enforcement, corrections, paralegal careers, and intelligence. Available both sessions.

June Session

All students in this track will choose:

CJ 100: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Philosophical and historical backgrounds, agencies, and processes of the criminal justice systems in the United States.

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

ISS 125: Introduction to Intelligence Studies
Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics
The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills.

July Session

All students in this track will take:

LA 201: Introduction to Law
Survey of the development of the law in our society; introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics.

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

The integrated marketing communications degree program is designed to teach students how to understand, engage, persuade and activate consumers. It includes the study of advertising, public relations, brand management and research into consumer insights, enabling students to build a customized toolbox of professional skills.

By focusing on the full spectrum of communication tools, with particular attention to interactive technology and media, IMC students discover consumers’ perceptions and demands and see “bottom-line” results on a global scale. Available July session only.

All students in this track will choose:

IMC 104. Introduction to Integrated Marketing and Communications
This course introduces the basic disciplines of IMC: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, database marketing, Internet marketing communication, and relationship marketing.

IMC 205. Writing for Integrated Marketing and Communications
This course focuses on developing students' skills in accurate, forceful, vivid and persuasive writing to advance a variety of IMC strategies.

International Students Only. Designed for students looking to improve their academic English speaking and writing abilities. Students will enroll in two Intensive English Program (IEP) courses and will be tested for course placement upon arrival. Instruction in Speaking & Listening, Reading, Writing and Grammar are given at 5 different instruction levels: Beginning, Intermediate, High Intermediate, Advanced, Advanced Plus. All courses incorporate modern technologies that assist in language learning, and students have opportunities to utilize the computer labs in the University’s Language Resource Center. Available both sessions.

The Intensive English Program also specializes in the design and implementation of programs to meet the curricular needs of specialized groups. Customized group programs are typically short term, for either one or two summer sessions. A minimum of 10 participants is required.

Are you considering a music major in college, or do you simply want to expand your appreciation and knowledge of music?  We have options for you from the Department of Music. Available July only.

Option 1: Future Music Majors
Future music majors take two academic classes (Mus 101 and 102) to better prepare them for college-level music instruction and receive personalized instruction on their specific instrument (brass, percussion, piano, string, voice or woodwind).

Mus 101. Introduction to Music Literature. This course provides an overall historical perspective including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions. It counts toward the music literature/history requirement for music majors.

Mus 102. Fundamentals of Music Theory. Fundamental concepts and principles of harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic structures, including their notation and interpretation. No previous instruction in music required. This course does not count toward the music major or minor, but prepares students for the required Mus 105 course.

Experiential learning opportunities: Future music majors will work with studio professors individually and in small groups to develop as musicians by cultivating a deeper understanding of and dedication to the performance, study, and creation of music.  The instruction will focus on the skills needed (technique, musicianship, and performance practice) to ensure a successful college entrance audition as a music major, such as repertoire choices, application, and audition procedures. They will give a short public concert at the end of the session; interact with current music faculty and students; attend several arts activities on campus; attend local music performances; tour the world-famous Blues Archive at UM; tour the Rock & Soul Museum and a major music site in Memphis such as Sun Studios or STAX Records.

Option 2: Non-music majors
Non-music majors who are only interested in music appreciation will enroll in Mus 103, which counts for general education credit for all degrees at UM. They may select a second elective course for Summer College. See “Electives” below.

Mus 103. Intro to Music. The study of elementary music elements and basic terminology, with an emphasis on identification of the major music styles in the Western civilization.  

Experiential learning opportunities: Non-music majors will attend several arts activities on campus; attend local music performances; view the world-famous Blues Archive at UM; tour the Rock & Soul Museum and a major music site in Memphis such as Sun Studios or STAX Records.

Come see why UM undergraduates have a higher than national average acceptance rate into health professional schools.  Students take two courses to provide a solid foundation for the pre-health professions.  Learn about various healthcare career options and explore the resources for your success in preparing for acceptance into the professional school of your choice. Available in both summer sessions.

Experiential learning opportunities: Students can engage in suture and IV clinics; have a lab experience with our synthetic cadaver used in an advanced anatomy & physiology course; tour the UM School of Nursing in Oxford; interact with representatives from various professional schools; learn about what to expect in shadowing health professionals from current UM students; have a private advising session with our Health Professions Advising Office.

All students in this track enroll in either Bisc 102 or Chem 101, which will help prepare students for success in the pre-med/science majors courses. Then select one more course that is either highly recommended or required for health professions. If you wish for guidance in course selection, please contact hpao@olemiss.edu. 

All students will take ONE of the following:

Bisc 102. Introduction to Human Biology. A survey course intended for nonbiology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance.  

Chem 101. Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Chem 101 for admission to the key introductory courses.

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

HP 203. First Aid and CPR. Safety instruction and practices in the methods as prescribed in the American Red Cross standard and advanced courses.

Math 115. Elementary Statistics. This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the proper statistical techniques used to estimate population parameters, and is highly recommended by health professional schools. These techniques include ways of setting up a well-defined study, methods for organizing and displaying data, and how to summarize data by using descriptive statistics. In addition, students will learn the basic concepts of probability and probability distributions as well as how to create confidence intervals and complete hypothesis tests.

Math 121. College Algebra. In this course, students will learn how to solve types of equations such as linear, quadratic, higher-order, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic equations. Students will also solve linear, polynomial, and rational inequalities. Other topics include the algebra of functions (including polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions), the graphs of some of these functions, and solving systems of equations in two variables. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Math 121 and 123 for admission to the key introductory courses.

PSY 201. General Psychology. This course is an introduction to individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

Come see why so many UM undergraduates are successful in admission to law school. Nationally, the top majors (the most applications and with admission rates over 80%) for admission for law school are: political science, English, history, economics, and philosophy. Learn what it takes to have a successful law school application, learn about legal careers, and explore different options for a college major while earning credit that will count towards the general education foundation. Available in both summer sessions.

Experiential Learning Opportunities: Students will have the opportunity to interact with faculty and admissions staff in the UM School of Law to learn about the law school experience, meet with our pre-law advisor to explore possible majors/minors for law school preparation, meet a panel of lawyers, and learn about the student organizations that are relevant for pre-law students.

All students in this track will take:

PHIL 103. Logic: Critical Thinking. This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction. 

Elective Courses (Choose 1 course below):

POL 101. Introduction to American Politics. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills. 

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. Students will follow two essential themes: study the successes and failures of capitalism as a defining characteristic of American business and society; how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. 

ENG 224. American Literature since the Civil War. This course provides students with a broad overview of the major literary movements and achievements of American authors from 1865 to the present. Our readings range across works by mid-nineteenth-century greats like Emily Dickinson and Mark Twain to more recent luminaries like Terrance Hayes and Jhumpa Lahiri. We’ll contextualize each piece within its historic time period and the social mood in which it was written and read, and also establish which American literary “movements,” if any—romanticism, realism, modernism, and beyond—these works of literature fall.

ECON 101. Introduction to Economics. This course is a primer for students who wish to have basic economic literacy, understand different economic concepts and policies, and develop critical thinking skills. Economics is not primarily a set of answers, but rather a method of reasoning. By the end of the semester, students should be able to use the analysis practiced in the course to form their own judgments about major economic problems faced by the United States and other countries. This course will count for general education credit in the College of Liberal Arts but not for an economics major or minor. Available June only.

ENG 226. Brit Lit Since the Romantic Period. This course will cover prose, poetry, and drama.

In partnership with the School of Pharmacy, rising seniors have the opportunity to get a glimpse of the pharmacy field inside and outside the classroom. In addition to gaining a solid grounding in core pharmacy subject areas, students will participate in site trips which will expose them to different pharmacy career pathways. Available only in second session.

Requirements: Minimum 3.5 GPA and 24 composite ACT (or SAT equivalent).

Chem 101. Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Chem 101 for admission to the key introductory courses.”

MATH 115: Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics; probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; and linear regression.

Students taking elective courses may choose from among the below courses, subject to scheduling availability and pre-requisites.

AAS 202: African American Experience II. This course is a multidisciplinary study of the African American experience using the study of culture and the arts as a major focus. Students will survey the events and social forces that have come to define contemporary African American life. We will study a diverse mix of academic and popular texts, from classic works to contemporary additions, autobiographies to ethnographies, essays to documentary film. Far-reaching topics such as the impact of employment and black family structures, what black hair styles reveal about the complex relationship between African Americans and whites; and how rap music represents both freedom of expression and police repression will all be explored.

Bisc 102. Introduction to Human Biology. A survey course intended for nonbiology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance.

Chem 101. Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Chem 101 for admission to the key introductory courses. Available only in July.

CJ 100: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Philosophical and historical backgrounds, agencies, and processes of the criminal justice systems in the United States. Available only in June.

ECON 101. Introduction to Economics. This course is a primer for students who wish to have basic economic literacy, understand different economic concepts and policies, and develop critical thinking skills. Economics is not primarily a set of answers, but rather a method of reasoning. By the end of the semester, students should be able to use the analysis practiced in the course to form their own judgments about major economic problems faced by the United States and other countries. This course will count for general education credit in the College of Liberal Arts but not for an economics major or minor. Available June only.

ENG 199. Intro to Creative Writing. Available July only.

ENG 226. Brit Lit Since the Romantic Period. This course will cover prose, poetry, and drama.

ENG 224. Survey of American Literature Since the Civil War. This course will cover prose, poetry, and drama.

G ST 201. Women, Gender, and Society. This interdisciplinary course draws from such areas as sociology, history, political science, communications and literature. Students will examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods.  The class will analyze how markers of one’s identity besides gender, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability, includes one’s experiences in culture.  

HIST 130. Intro to U.S. History to 1877. This course is an introduction to political, cultural, social, and economic development of the US to 1877.

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. One theme of the course is exploring how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges are particularly important in our history for they mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question. 

IMC 104. Introduction to Integrated Marketing and Communications. This course introduces the basic disciplines of IMC: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, database marketing, Internet marketing communication, and relationship marketing.

IMC 205. Writing for Integrated Marketing and Communications. This course focuses on developing students' skills in accurate, forceful, vivid and persuasive writing to advance a variety of IMC strategies.

ISS 125: Introduction to Intelligence Studies 
Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers. Available only in June.

Jour 361: Black Mirror, The Twilight Zone and Media.
The British science-fiction anthology series set in the near future explores the potential consequences of social media and future technology. Each episode has a different cast with a unique story and, like most science fiction, it offers a prophetic warning about what could happen if we lose control and allow technology to control us. Recognizing the show's potential as a discussion starter about modern and future media, students will watch specific episodes of “Black Mirror" and think critically about the program. Through class discussions and writing exercises, they will envision the future of social media and technology. Some selected content will be hosted on a Black Mirror Project website. The class will also analyze topical developments and news stories related to the impact of social media on society. Other science and speculative fiction movies and television shows, such as The Twilight Zone, will be examined. We'll speculate about what the future holds, good and bad, with media and technology. And we’ll discuss what we can learn about journalism and a free society from science fiction visions of dystopias. Available July session only.

Jour 362: Video Storytelling.
Video storytelling is an essential skill whether you are going into film or TV, social media or advertising, PR or journalism, and the goal of this class is to give students a fundamental understanding of how to use video to tell a quality story. Students will learn to research, report, capture, and edit short, focused video stories designed specifically for the web. Available July session only.

LA 201: Introduction to Law
Survey of the development of the law in our society; introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics. Available only in July.

MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

PHIL 103. Logic: Critical Thinking. This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction.

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics
The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills.

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

SPCH 102: Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Fundamentals of organizing, preparing, and delivering speeches in a variety of public forums. This course will prepare students to speak comfortably before audiences, adapting message to context and developing an increased awareness of all aspects of presentation – verbal, physical, and visual.

What Students are Saying

Former participants have shared their feedback with us. Take a look!


“My counselor was so supportive and understanding. He listened when I was frustrated or stressed, and he even helped me organize my classes for freshman year.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2017

“Summer College gave me a new point of view on the USA in general, and it was completely different from what I expected. I definitely felt at home here.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2018

“The impact that Summer College has on me is one that I am forever thankful for. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2018