Academics - Residential

Summer College students may choose from a selection of specialty tracks designed to enrich their exposure to major and minor courses of study. Students designating a track will benefit from additional contact with university departments outside of class. Examples of activities may include field trips, meeting with department faculty, and attendance at special events.

Departments are still reviewing their summer offerings, so expect this list of tracks to continue to expand.

Alternatively, Summer College students can build their own track by choosing two courses from our list of elective courses without the additional benefits of selecting a track.

Please note: Some tracks are only available in either June or July session.

Available June and July:

Contemporary national events show us the need to build a more just society in America. Earn college credit and explore possible majors/minors while thinking about how we build a more just and inclusive society.  Students in this track are encouraged to take the Introduction to Sociology course, then select one additional course that allows you to concentrate on the social groups that interest you the most.

Experiential learning:

Engage in a service-learning project to put the ideas into action. Possible field trips include National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis and the local Burns-Belfry Museum and Multicultural Center. Talk with faculty involved in the Center for Study of Southern Culture, Prison to College Pipeline program, UM Slavery Research Group, McLean Institute for Community Development, and the Center for Population Studies. 

Dedicated scholarships are available for students in this track, particularly for Mississippi residents. More details on our scholarship page or inquire by contacting precollege@olemiss.edu.

Course Offerings:

Highly recommended: SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology. Learn to analyze society and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. Explore how groups create meaning through everyday interaction; how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family; how inequality is maintained and resisted; and how social change occurs.

Second course may be chosen from:

  • G ST 201. Women, Gender, and Society. Examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods. Analyze markers of one’s identity such as gender, race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability.
  • AAS 201. African American Experience I. Study the African American experience, with emphasis on historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and social-psychological issues. Gain a general picture of the African American experience and to reflect the principles, concepts, and ideas of this experience through the voices of African Americans.
  • S St 101. Introduction to Southern Studies I. Investigate the South from multiple perspectives: historical, literary, cultural, intellectual, musical, and political. Learn key communication skills as you discuss, both orally and in writing, your observations about the South. 
  • Hst 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. Explore how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question. 
  • POL 101: Intro to American Politics. Learn the dynamics of American national government and policies. Understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. Refine your analytical and expressive skills.

Available June:

If you are concerned about the problems of people with speech, language or hearing disabilities, you might consider a career in one of the fields of communicative disorders. Future health, education, and counseling professionals may also find this track rewarding.

A career in communicative disorders offers many opportunities for service to humankind, as well as a continuing challenge to researchers because of the infinite complexity of communication processes. Professionals in communicative disorders can serve both adults and children in a variety of settings.

Required:

CSD 201: Introduction to Communicative Disorders
This course will introduce disorders of speech, language, and audition with emphasis on recognition, causation, and principles of management. The course is enriched with hands-on experience in conducting middle-ear and hearing screenings, observation of speech-therapy sessions, and guest speakers including faculty and individuals working in different areas of the field. The class is expected to be useful to a variety of majors including any health-related fields, music, engineering, psychology etc.

Second Course - Choose any, including those recommended below:

  • Bisc 206. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Learn the anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems within the human body. Labs will entail examination of anatomical structures using dissected specimens, models, imagery, and computer simulations.
  • PSY 201. General Psychology. Explore individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.
  • SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology. Learn to analyze society and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. Explore how groups create meaning through everyday interaction; how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family; how inequality is maintained and resisted; and how social change occurs.

Available June only. The Engineering and Computer Science Track offers high school students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of engineering as a discipline and develop their proficiency in one of the fastest growing programming languages, Python.

Students have the opportunity to acquire technical and problem-solving skills needed to contribute to critical-need areas, such as artificial intelligence and robotics. During the session, students will collaborate with peers to develop an integrated solution to a more complex engineering problem.

The benefits of the program include earning college credit while living on campus with other participants from the United States and abroad, acquiring real-world engineering skills, and meeting with UM faculty to explore engineering as a profession.

Experiential learning opportunities: Hear from experts conducting innovative research; meet professionals to explore career pathways; go behind the scenes at local industries; learn about entrepreneurial opportunities in engineering and programming; participate in social activities, such as pizza/ice cream parties and movie nights; and interact with current engineering students and faculty.

Required. ENGR 100. This course will introduce 1st year undergraduate engineering students to the engineering profession and, in particular, to the fields of engineering study offered at Ole Miss. Students will be introduced to the various engineering fields, learn problem-solving skills essential for an engineering mindset, and work in a team to solve real-world problems.

Required. CSCI 256 (Python). Students will develop their proficiency with Python, developing algorithms to solve computational problems and learning to express algorithms using pseudocode. Hands-on practice debugging programs and developing test cases will simulate real-world problem-solving. Students will gain practice working in a group to solve a more complex programming problem.

Appreciate and create the art of your choice in order to build your skills and have better appreciation of the fine & performing arts through emphases in art & art history, film, music, and theatre arts. Students will have many opportunities to learn what it means to study the fine & performing arts at the collegiate level. There is a common application for admission to any of the emphases.

Dedicated scholarships are available for students in these emphases, particularly for Mississippi residents. Review our scholarship information or inquire at schs@olemiss.edu for details.

TRACK EMPHASIS: Theatre Arts

Session: June

Have you enjoyed performing in or attending a live theatre performance? This summer experience will deepen your appreciation of theatre, enhance your basic theatre skills to maximize your college theatre admission and scholarship chances, or simply perform better in an upcoming high school theatre production.

Experiential Learning Opportunities:

Tour theatre facilities and learn more about theatre production; engage in key skills workshops such as improv techniques, voice-over techniques, dance workshop, make-up, lighting, etc.; attend several arts activities on and off campus.

  • Thea 201. Appreciation of the Theatre. Learn to appreciate the theatre as performance art and develop perceptive audience standards through demonstrations of the unique characteristics of theatre. Learn the varieties and styles of theatrical arts and crafts and their means of production; the functions of theatre artists; the form and structure of the play; and, a survey of the history of theatre. 
  • Thea 260. Fundamentals of Acting. Develop techniques of acting for the modern stage.

TRACK EMPHASIS: Film Production

Session: June

Do you wish for a more critical appreciation of movies or are considering a career in the film industry?  These two courses provide an introduction of cinema and a basic film production skills course for students considering a future major in film production and wish to maximize their scholarship/admission auditions.

Experiential Learning Opportunities:

Watch and evaluate several movies; work in a film production complex to learn fundamental techniques of basic film production; interact with entertainment industry professionals; and attend arts activities on and campus.

Course Offerings:

  • THEA 202. Introduction to Cinema. Learn methods of film analysis and important moments in cinema history, while gaining a behind-the-scenes look at how films are made.
  • Thea 261. Fundamentals of Film Production. Gain fundamental techniques of basic film production including development, production, and post production.

TRACK EMPHASIS: Music

Session: June

Are you considering a music major or minor in college? Participating in this track will enhance your skills for future admission/scholarship auditions, and expand your knowledge of studying music at the collegiate level. You can join our music community early and establish a mentorship relationship with our faculty and students. Top off your experience by engaging with small ensembles in our department.

Dedicated scholarships are available for students in these emphases, particularly for Mississippi residents. Review our scholarship information or inquire at schs@olemiss.edu for details.

Experiential learning opportunities:

Interact with current UM music students at the Creative Coffee Hour; visit the world-famous Blues Archive; attend concerts and interact with world famous musicians, including Artist in Residence Bruce Levingston; visit STAX Records in Memphis; engage in a sound walk with a musicologist; and attend arts activities on and off campus.

Course offerings:

Potential music majors or minors take one academic class required for music majors and minors and then experience performance opportunities including small ensemble/studio lessons.

  • Mus 101. Intro to Music Literature. Gain an overall historical perspective of music literature, including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions.
  • Mus 118. Fundamentals of Performance. Learn musical techniques, exercises, and literature through private study, ensembles, and master classes. Activities in the course include lessons with experts, informal performances with other musicians, field trips, mock auditions, and a culminating performance.

TRACK EMPHASIS: Art & Art History

Session: June

Are you an artist who wishes to increase your skills? Do you enjoy touring museums and viewing art while learning about the context and meaning of that art? Students who take these courses are completing required courses for the art major and art history majors at UM. And, the art history course completes a general education requirement for all degree programs at UM.

Experiential Learning Opportunities:

Tour of the UM Museum, local galleries, and the Dixon Gallery in Memphis; tour the UM art facilities and visit with students and faculty; visit with local artists; engage in art workshops such as relief printmaking, blacksmithing, paper making, painting, and book binding; attend several arts activities on and off campus.

Art students must choose to take one of the 4-hour studio courses. They are not required to take an additional course, though the History of Art II is recommended.

Required art studio course:

  • Art 111. Drawing I. Learn traditional drawing techniques and skills with a primary focus on perspective.

Recommended:

AH 202. History of Art II. Learn movements and masters in the development of Western and non-Western painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance through the present. Examine variety of aesthetic styles, contextual perspectives, artists, and exemplary works of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts.

Come see why UM undergraduates have a much higher than national average acceptance rate into health professional schools.  Students take two courses to provide a solid foundation for the pre-health professions. Learn about various healthcare career options and explore the resources for your success in preparing for acceptance into the professional school of your choice.

Experiential learning opportunities:

Participate in skills clinics such as suture and IV; have a lab experience with our synthetic cadaver used in an advanced anatomy & physiology course; tour the UM School of Nursing in Oxford; interact with representatives from various professional schools; learn about what to expect in shadowing health professionals from current UM students; have a private advising session with our Health Professions Advising Office.

Choose two courses from those listed below:

  • Bisc 206. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Learn the anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems within the human body. Labs will entail examination of anatomical structures using dissected specimens, models, imagery, and computer simulations. June only.
  • PSY 201. General Psychology. Explore individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.
  • Mathematics is the foundation of a health professional educational pathway. Choose one of the following in consultation with our academic advisors.
    • Math 115. Statistics.
    • Math 121. College Algebra.
    • Math 123. Trigonometry.
    • Math 125. Basic Mathematics for Science and Engineering. This pre-calculus course combines algebra and trig.

Available June and July:

Learn what it takes to have a successful law school application, learn about legal careers, and explore different options for a college major while earning credit that will count towards the general education foundation and pre-law electives.

All students in this track are strongly encouraged to take PHIL 103, as the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) has logic/analytical reasoning as 3 of 5 sections on the test.

Experiential Learning Opportunities:

Interact with faculty and students in the UM School of Law, meet with our pre-law advisor to explore possible majors/minors for law school preparation, meet a panel of lawyers, and learn about the student organizations that are relevant for pre-law students.

Highly recommended: PHIL 103. Logic: Critical Thinking. Gain a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Learn the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction. 

Second course may be chosen from:

  • POL 101. Introduction to American Politics. Learn the dynamics of American national government and policies. Understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. Refine your analytical and expressive skills. 
  • Hst 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. Explore how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question. 
  • Any 200-level English literature, such as ENG 224. American Literature since the Civil War. Overview the trends and literary movements that shaped America as it emerged from the turmoil of the Civil War to become a world power. 
  • Econ 202. Principles of Microeconomics. Use analytical and historical analysis to model the behavior of the two basic elements of a market economy: consumers and producers. Address the role of government policy both as an economic agent and the custodian of society’s goals and priorities.

Students taking elective courses may choose from among the below courses, subject to scheduling availability and pre-requisites.

AAS 201: African American Experience I. This course is a multidisciplinary study of the African American experience, with emphasis on historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and social-psychological issues in the study of African Americans. The objective is to present a general picture of the African American experience and to reflect the principles, concepts, and ideas of this experience through the voices of African Americans.

AH 202: History of Art II. This course is a survey of representative movements and masters in the historical development of Western and non-Western painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance through the present. A variety of aesthetic styles, contextual perspectives, artists, and exemplary works of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts will be examined and considered. June session only.

ART 111: Drawing. An introduction to traditional drawing techniques and skills with a primary focus on perspective. June session only.

BISC 102: Introduction to Human Biology. A survey course intended for nonbiology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance.

CHEM 101: Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Chem 101 for admission to the key introductory courses. Available only in July.

CLC 201: Medical Terminology in Greek and Latin. A linguistic introduction to scientific and medical vocabulary derived from words, roots, and forms of Greek and Latin. No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

CJ 100: Introduction to Criminal Justice. Philosophical and historical backgrounds, agencies, and processes of the criminal justice systems in the United States. Available only in June.

CSCI 111: Computer Science - Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

ECON 101: Introduction to Economics. This course is a primer for students who wish to have basic economic literacy, understand different economic concepts and policies, and develop critical thinking skills. Economics is not primarily a set of answers, but rather a method of reasoning. By the end of the semester, students should be able to use the analysis practiced in the course to form their own judgments about major economic problems faced by the United States and other countries. This course will count for general education credit in the College of Liberal Arts but not for an economics major or minor. Available June only.

ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the problem-solving methods that engineers use when applying scientific principles for the creation of realistic solutions to everyday technical problems. Available June only.

ENG 199: Intro to Creative Writing. The class follows a workshop model in which students share their writing (poetry and short stories) with the rest of the class and offer constructive feedback. Available July only.

ENG 224: Survey of American Literature since the Civil War. This course will cover prose, poetry, and drama.

GERM 111: Intensive Elementary German. An introduction to the German language, focusing on skills of speaking, reading, writing, and vocabulary acquisition. No prior knowledge of German required.

G ST 201: Women, Gender, and Society. This interdisciplinary course draws from such areas as sociology, history, political science, communications and literature. Students will examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods.  The class will analyze how markers of one’s identity besides gender, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability, includes one’s experiences in culture. 

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. One theme of the course is exploring how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges are particularly important in our history for they mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question.

IMC 100: Ideas in IMC. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in integrated marketing communications.

ISS 125: Introduction to Intelligence Studies. Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers. Available only in June.

JOUR 101: Ideas in Journalism. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in journalism and new media.

LA 201: Introduction to Law. Survey of the development of the law in our society; introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics. Available only in July.

MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

MUS 101: Introduction to Music Literature. This course provides an overall historical perspective including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions.

MUS 102: Fundamentals of Music Theory. Improve your ear, build your sight-singing skills, and get a jump on college music theory in a low-pressure, well-paced setting.

MUS 103: Intro to Music. The study of elementary music elements and basic terminology, with an emphasis on identification of the major music styles in the Western civilization. June session only.

PHIL 103. Logic: Critical Thinking. This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction.

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills.

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

SPCH 102: Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Fundamentals of organizing, preparing, and delivering speeches in a variety of public forums. This course will prepare students to speak comfortably before audiences, adapting message to context and developing an increased awareness of all aspects of presentation – verbal, physical, and visual.