Academics - Residential

Summer College students may choose from a selection of specialty tracks designed to enrich their exposure to major and minor courses of study. Students designating a track will benefit from additional contact with university departments outside of class. Examples of activities may include field trips, meeting with department faculty, and attendance at special events.

Departments are still reviewing their summer offerings, so expect this list of tracks to continue to expand.

Alternatively, Summer College students can build their own track by choosing two courses from our list of elective courses without the additional benefits of selecting a track.

Please note: Some tracks are only available in either June or July session.

Contemporary national events show us the need to build a more just society in America. Earn general education credit and explore possible majors/minors while thinking about how we build a more just and inclusive society.  Students in this track are encouraged to take the Introduction to Sociology course, then select one additional course that allows you to concentrate on the social groups that interest you the most.

Experiential learning: Possible field trips include National Civil Rights Museum and the local Burns-Belfry Museum and Multicultural Center. Talk with faculty involved in the Center for Study of Southern Culture, Prison to College Pipeline program, UM Slavery Research Group, McLean Institute for Community Development, and the Center for Population Studies. Engage in a service-learning project.

Strongly encouraged

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

Choose from:

G ST 201: Women, Gender, and Society. This interdisciplinary course draws from such areas as sociology, history, political science, communications and literature. Students will examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods.  The class will analyze how markers of one’s identity besides gender, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability, includes one’s experiences in culture.  

Any African American Studies, such as AAS 201: African American Experience I. This course is a multidisciplinary study of the African American experience, with emphasis on historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and social-psychological issues in the study of African Americans. The objective is to present a general picture of the African American experience and to reflect the principles, concepts, and ideas of this experience through the voices of African Americans.

S ST 101: Introduction to Southern Studies I. This interdisciplinary course investigates the South from multiple perspectives: historical, literary, cultural, intellectual, musical, and political. Students are introduced to an important trend in higher education - interdisciplinary study – and are provided with key communication skills as they discuss, both orally and in writing, their observations about the South that surrounds them. 

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. One theme of the course is exploring how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges are particularly important in our history for they mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question. 

POL 101: Intro to American Politics. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills. 

Whether you wish to pursue the ABET/CAC-accredited B.S. of Computer Science degree through our School of Engineering or the B.A. of Computer Science through the College of Liberal Arts, this track will give you an introductory background in computer science as well as electives that will support your success in pursuing careers in this field. Available June session only.

All students in this track will choose:

CSCI 111: Computer Science. Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

Students will additionally select one elective of their choice.

Gain a fresh understanding of crime and criminal justice in the United States and abroad through the courses offered in this track and explore areas of possible emphasis within Criminal Justice Studies including homeland security, law enforcement, corrections, paralegal careers, and intelligence.

JULY SESSION

All students in this track will take:

LA 201: Introduction to Law. Survey of the development of the law in our society; introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics.

Elective Courses (choose 1 course below):

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy, politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

Designed to expose high school students to a variety of engineering and computer science disciplines to assist them in making informed decisions about possible college majors. The program is designed for the exemplary high school student interested in applied mathematics, science, and technology. Available June only.

All students in this track will choose:

ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the problem-solving methods that engineers use when applying scientific principles for the creation of realistic solutions to everyday technical problems. 

Suggested Electives (Choose 1 course below)

MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

Appreciate and create the art of your choice to build your skills and have better appreciation of the fine or performing arts. This track offers courses in art & art history and music, depending on the summer term. Students may choose to take both courses from a single department or choose any two courses offered in this track.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

Are you considering a music major in college, or do you simply want to expand your appreciation and knowledge of music? We have options for you from the Department of Music! We also have scholarships ranging from $1000 to full funding of the program.

Potential music majors take two academic classes (MUS 102 and 101) AND receive personalized instruction on their specific instrument (brass, percussion, piano, string, voice or woodwind).*

MUS 101. Introduction to Music Literature. This course provides an overall historical perspective including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions. This course does count toward the music major.

MUS 102: Fundamentals of Music Theory. Fundamental concepts and principles of harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic structures, including their notation and interpretation. No previous instruction in music required. This course does not count toward the music major or minor, but prepares students for the required MUS 105 course.

*Unique to this program, students will also work with studio professors individually and in small groups to develop as musicians by cultivating a deeper understanding of and dedication to the performance, study, and creation of music. The instruction will focus on the skills needed (technique, musicianship, and performance practice) to ensure a successful college entrance audition as a music major (repertoire choices, application, and audition procedures).

Experiential learning opportunities: Future music majors will give a short public concert at the end of the session; interact with current music faculty and students; attend several arts activities on campus, including art and cinema; attend local music performances; view the world-famous Blues Archive at UM; tour the Rock & Soul Museum and a major music site in Memphis including possibly Sun Studios or STAX Records.

Non-music majors who are only interested in music appreciation will enroll in MUS 103 which counts for general education credit for all degrees at UM. They should also select another course from this track.

MUS 101: Introduction to Music Literature This course provides an overall historical perspective including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions.

MUS 103: Intro to Music. The study of elementary music elements and basic terminology, with an emphasis on identification of the major music styles in the Western civilization.

Experiential learning opportunities: attend several arts activities on campus, including art and cinema; attend local music performances; view the world-famous Blues Archive at UM; tour the Rock & Soul Museum and a major music site in Memphis including possibly Sun Studios or STAX Records.

DEPARTMENT OF ART & ART HISTORY

Are you an artist who wishes to increase your skills? Do you enjoy touring museums and viewing art while learning about the context and meaning of that art?  Students who take these courses are completing required courses for the art major and art history major at UM. And, the art history course completes a general education requirement for all degree programs at UM. Available in June session only.

Experiential Learning Opportunities: Students will have a guided tour of the UM Museum, local galleries, and the Dixon Gallery in Memphis; tour the UM art facilities and visit with students and faculty; visit with local artists; those in the art studio course will host a public show of their work produced during the summer session; attend several arts activities on campus, including music and theatre.

AH 202: History of Art II. This course is a survey of representative movements and masters in the historical development of Western and non-Western painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance through the present. A variety of aesthetic styles, contextual perspectives, artists, and exemplary works of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts will be examined and considered.

ART 111: Drawing. An introduction to traditional drawing techniques and skills with a primary focus on perspective.

Take German this summer and learn the language of Mozart, Einstein, and Martin Luther! It’s also the language of the fourth-largest economy in the world and the most widely-spoken language in Europe. In this track, you’ll not only learn the basics of speaking, reading, and writing German. You’ll also get to know German culture, try German snacks, and watch German movies—all while getting college-level credit! Available July session only.

All students in this track will take:

GERM 111: Intensive Elementary German. An introduction to the German language, focusing on skills of speaking, reading, writing, and vocabulary acquisition. No prior knowledge of German required.

Our exclusive summer school program offers high school students from all across the country the unique opportunity to explore the fields of journalism and integrated marketing communications (IMC). You’ll learn about writing, public relations, advertising, social media, photo and video storytelling, and more!

It’s your chance to get a jumpstart on your University of Mississippi degree with two courses that will apply directly to our award-winning Bachelor of Arts in Journalism or the Bachelor of Science in Integrated Marketing Communications (from the largest IMC program in the country).

Experiential Learning Opportunities: Students will interact with faculty and admissions staff in the UM School of Journalism & New Media to learn about our scholarship opportunities, student organizations including our amazing Student Media Center, HottyToddy.com and UMSquare – our fashion magazine. Plus, you’ll meet with some of our top graduates – working for companies like ESPN, TikTok, FedEx, AppleNews and CNN, to name just a few. Our hashtag is #RealWorldRightNow and we mean it! We’ll give you a taste of the real world of journalism and IMC, right now, in Summer 2021.

Available July session only.

JOUR 101: Ideas in Journalism. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in journalism and new media.

IMC 100: Ideas in IMC. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in integrated marketing communications.

Come see why UM undergraduates have a much higher than the national average acceptance rate into health professional schools. Students take two courses to provide a solid foundation for the pre-health professions. Learn about various healthcare career options and explore the resources available to set you up for success in preparing for acceptance into the professional school of your choice.

Experiential learning opportunities: Students can engage in suture and IV clinics; have a lab experience with our synthetic cadaver used in an advanced anatomy & physiology course; tour the UM School of Nursing in Oxford; interact with representatives from various professional schools; learn about what to expect in shadowing health professionals from current UM students; have a private advising session with our Health Professions Advising Office.

Choose from:

BISC 102: Introduction to Human Biology. A survey course intended for non-biology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance. 

CHEM 101: Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116.

If students are prepared, then they can consider CHEM 105 with lab, the chemistry majors/pre-med intro course.

Then select one more course below that is either highly recommended or required for health professions.  If you wish for guidance in course selection, please contact hpao@olemiss.edu.

CLC 201: Medical Terminology in Greek and Latin. A linguistic introduction to scientific and medical vocabulary derived from words, roots, and forms of Greek and Latin. No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

HP 203: First Aid and CPR. Safety instruction and practices in the methods as prescribed in the American Red Cross standard and advanced courses.

PSY 201: General Psychology. This course is an introduction to individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

Come see why so many UM undergraduates are successful in admission to law school. Nationally, the top majors (the most applications and with admission rates over 80%) for admission for law school are: political science, English, history, economics, and philosophy. Learn what it takes to have a successful law school application, learn about legal careers, and explore different options for a college major while earning credit that will count towards the general education foundation.

All students in this track are strongly encouraged to take PHIL 103, as the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) has logic/analytical reasoning as 3 of 5 sections on the test. Then select one more course to explore possible majors/minors in preparation for law school.

Experiential Learning Opportunities: Students will have the opportunity to interact with faculty and admissions staff in the UM School of Law to learn about the law school experience, meet with our pre-law advisor to explore possible majors/minors for law school preparation, meet a panel of lawyers, and learn about the student organizations that are relevant for pre-law students.

Strongly Encouraged:

PHIL 103: Logic: Critical Thinking. This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction. 

Other courses to choose from include:

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills. 

Any History.  For example: HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. Students will follow two essential themes: study the successes and failures of capitalism as a defining characteristic of American business and society; how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. 

Any English. For example: ENG 224: American Literature since the Civil War. This course will provide an overview of the trends and literary movements that shaped America as it emerged from the turmoil of the Civil War to become a world power. The main literary movements covered are: realism, a turning away from the reform-minded, romantic American Renaissance following the devastation of the Civil War; naturalism, a Darwinian inspired looked at man as a soulless creature buffeted about by forces beyond his control; modernism, another reaction to the devastation of war (WWI) and the alienation of modern, urban life; and postmodernism, a reaction to living in a world capable of nuclear annihilation and to the increasing commodification of American life. 

Any Economics. For example: ECON 101: Introduction to Economics. This course is a primer for students who wish to have basic economic literacy, understand different economic concepts and policies, and develop critical thinking skills. Economics is not primarily a set of answers, but rather a method of reasoning. By the end of the semester, students should be able to use the analysis practiced in the course to form their own judgments about major economic problems faced by the United States and other countries. This course will count for general education credit in the College of Liberal Arts but not for an economics major or minor. Available June only.

Students taking elective courses may choose from among the below courses, subject to scheduling availability and pre-requisites.

AAS 201: African American Experience I. This course is a multidisciplinary study of the African American experience, with emphasis on historical, sociological, cultural, economic, and social-psychological issues in the study of African Americans. The objective is to present a general picture of the African American experience and to reflect the principles, concepts, and ideas of this experience through the voices of African Americans.

AH 202: History of Art II. This course is a survey of representative movements and masters in the historical development of Western and non-Western painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance through the present. A variety of aesthetic styles, contextual perspectives, artists, and exemplary works of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts will be examined and considered. June session only.

ART 111: Drawing. An introduction to traditional drawing techniques and skills with a primary focus on perspective. June session only.

BISC 102: Introduction to Human Biology. A survey course intended for nonbiology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance.

CHEM 101: Chemical Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry. Intended for students who have not completed high school chemistry and need additional preparation before undertaking the general chemistry course sequence, Chem 105/106/115/116. Students who have less than a 25 on the math portion of the ACT (SAT 580 or SATR 590) and plan to take chemistry and biology at UM can use a B minimum in Chem 101 for admission to the key introductory courses. Available only in July.

CLC 201: Medical Terminology in Greek and Latin. A linguistic introduction to scientific and medical vocabulary derived from words, roots, and forms of Greek and Latin. No previous knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

CJ 100: Introduction to Criminal Justice. Philosophical and historical backgrounds, agencies, and processes of the criminal justice systems in the United States. Available only in June.

CSCI 111: Computer Science - Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

ECON 101: Introduction to Economics. This course is a primer for students who wish to have basic economic literacy, understand different economic concepts and policies, and develop critical thinking skills. Economics is not primarily a set of answers, but rather a method of reasoning. By the end of the semester, students should be able to use the analysis practiced in the course to form their own judgments about major economic problems faced by the United States and other countries. This course will count for general education credit in the College of Liberal Arts but not for an economics major or minor. Available June only.

ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the problem-solving methods that engineers use when applying scientific principles for the creation of realistic solutions to everyday technical problems. Available June only.

ENG 199: Intro to Creative Writing. The class follows a workshop model in which students share their writing (poetry and short stories) with the rest of the class and offer constructive feedback. Available July only.

ENG 224: Survey of American Literature since the Civil War. This course will cover prose, poetry, and drama.

GERM 111: Intensive Elementary German. An introduction to the German language, focusing on skills of speaking, reading, writing, and vocabulary acquisition. No prior knowledge of German required.

G ST 201: Women, Gender, and Society. This interdisciplinary course draws from such areas as sociology, history, political science, communications and literature. Students will examine women’s identities, roles, and statuses, with an accompanying awareness of how “manhood” is socially constructed in different cultures and historical periods.  The class will analyze how markers of one’s identity besides gender, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and ability, includes one’s experiences in culture. 

HST 131: Introduction to US History since 1877. This course introduces the major themes and events in the history of the United States from the nation’s emergence from Reconstruction to the present. One theme of the course is exploring how the nation has responded to repeated social and political confrontations, which are labeled “the challenge of the minority,” however that minority might be defined. These challenges are particularly important in our history for they mark periods of social activism wherein the very concept of what it means to be an American has been called into question.

IMC 100: Ideas in IMC. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in integrated marketing communications.

ISS 125: Introduction to Intelligence Studies. Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers. Available only in June.

JOUR 101: Ideas in Journalism. This course focuses on covering emerging trends or skills that may become essential to practitioners in journalism and new media.

LA 201: Introduction to Law. Survey of the development of the law in our society; introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics. Available only in July.

MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT math subscore or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

MUS 101: Introduction to Music Literature. This course provides an overall historical perspective including style recognition and familiarity with major composers and compositions.

MUS 102: Fundamentals of Music Theory. Improve your ear, build your sight-singing skills, and get a jump on college music theory in a low-pressure, well-paced setting.

MUS 103: Intro to Music. The study of elementary music elements and basic terminology, with an emphasis on identification of the major music styles in the Western civilization. June session only.

PHIL 103. Logic: Critical Thinking. This course is a general introduction to logic as an art of critical thinking. Students are introduced to the concepts and practice of formal and informal reasoning, deduction and induction.

POL 101: Introduction to American Politics. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce the dynamics of American national government and policies. Students will better understand our political system in several different and important ways: as a set of primary and underlying values; as a series of governing principles; as processes in which forces compete; as separate institutions with powers and limitations; and, as a framework for human behavior and interactions. In addition, this course helps students refine their analytical and expressive skills.

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience. The course may include a survey of the following topics within psychology: learning; intelligence; stress and health; individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, perceiving, social behavior, personality; psychological disorders; and social psychology. The course will also offer an introduction to research methods in psychology.

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human social behavior. Students learn to analyze society from new viewpoints and better understand how individuals are shaped by powerful social forces. The course explores how groups create meaning through everyday interaction, how power functions in important social institutions such as the economy politics, education, and the family, how systems of inequality are maintained and resisted, and how social change occurs.

SPCH 102: Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Fundamentals of organizing, preparing, and delivering speeches in a variety of public forums. This course will prepare students to speak comfortably before audiences, adapting message to context and developing an increased awareness of all aspects of presentation – verbal, physical, and visual.

What Students are Saying

Former participants have shared their feedback with us. Take a look!


“My counselor was so supportive and understanding. He listened when I was frustrated or stressed, and he even helped me organize my classes for freshman year.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2017

“Summer College gave me a new point of view on the USA in general, and it was completely different from what I expected. I definitely felt at home here.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2018

“The impact that Summer College has on me is one that I am forever thankful for. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

Student ParticipantSummer 2018