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Summer Academy Culture Day

What is Summer Academy?

The University of Mississippi's Summer Academy gives students entering the 8th, 9th, or 10th grades a taste of college life by offering a two-week residential academic program. Summer Academy offers three sessions with different courses offered during each session. Each course offered is listed in the Mississippi curriculum framework, but not generally offered in high school curricula across the state. Students can earn a 1/2 Carnegie unit that may be counted by their high school toward elective graduation requirements, however, whether credit is counted or not is determined by each student's high school.

Who Can Apply?

In-state, as well as out-of-state students who attend public, private, parochial or who are home- schooled, are welcome to apply as long as they meet the following criteria:
  • Students must be rising 8th, 9th, or 10th graders and be in good academic and conduct standing.
  • Students must have an overall 3.0 GPA for their last three years in school.
  • Students must have standardized achievement test scores at or above the present grade level for their last three years in school.

General Information about Summer Academy

Session Dates

1st session: May 31-June 12, 2015
2nd session: June 14-June 26, 2015
3rd session: July 5-July 17, 2015

Courses

Summer Academy students choose one course per session and are welcome to attend more than one session. Certified high school teachers teach the Summer Academy courses. Classes meet in academic classrooms on campus and are held from 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Saturdays are reserved for field trips for most courses.

Supervision

Counselors supervise students at all times. Counselors are Ole Miss students who have been through an extensive interview process and thorough background check. Counselors participate in a mandatory training program prior to the summer.

Housing

Students who choose to be residential are housed in campus residence halls with males and females being housed separately. Only Summer Academy (along with Ninth Grade Lott) students are housed in these dorms during the summer. Students may request to room with a friend as long as both parties submit the same request. For students who do not have a roommate preference, our office will pair them with someone based on answers supplied to us on a questionnaire.

Commuters

Commuters must be dropped off at the designated spot each morning by 7:45 a.m. and picked up at the designated spot by 4:45 p.m. each afternoon. Commuters will eat lunch on campus each day and lunch is included in the total cost.

Meals

Weekday meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), as well as dinner on Saturday and Sunday, are served in on-campus dining facilities and are included in the cost of the program.  Breakfast is not served on the weekends.  Students who eat breakfast should bring breakfast bars or something similar to tide them over until lunchtime. Students are transported to local restaurants for lunch on Sunday. Off campus meal costs are the responsibility of the students.

Medical Care

Due to their age, Summer Academy students are not allowed access to the Student Health Center on campus. Students requiring non-emergency medical care between the hours of 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. will be transported to an urgent care facility with parent’s approval. There is not an after hours medical clinic in Oxford, so students requiring medical care after 7 p.m. and before 9 a.m. are transported to the emergency room at Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi again with parent’s approval.

Visitors

Due to the strenuous schedule of activities involved in the program, visitors are not allowed during the week. Students may have visitors after class on Saturday and on Sunday. Students may go home after class on Saturday but must report back to their respective dorm by 5 p.m. on Sunday. Activities around campus will be planned for students who choose to stay during the remainder of the weekend.

Typical Daily Schedule

7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Breakfast
8:15 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Morning Class with Break
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Afternoon Class with Break
4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Recreation or Special Activity
6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Study, Computer Lab, Study Groups, Free Time
10:00 p.m. Curfew

Sessions and Courses Offered

Summer Academy students choose one course per session and are welcome to attend more than one session. Certified high school teachers teach the Summer Academy courses. Classes meet in academic classrooms on campus and are held from 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Saturdays are reserved for field trips for most courses.

Click course title to hide/show course description.  An asterisk (*) denotes courses recommended for 9th and 10th grade students.

{COLLAPSE ALL}

Session I: May 31-June 12, 2015

• ACT Prep*

The ACT (according to www.actstudent.org) is a national college admissions examination that consists of subject area tests in English, math, science, reading. The ACT Plus Writing includes the four subject area tests plus a 30-minute Writing Test. All 4-year colleges and universities in the U.S accept ACT results. The results from these tests must be included as part of applications for admission to most four-year colleges and universities. Because admissions are becoming increasingly competitive, good ACT test scores can give students an edge on the competition.

This course is designed to help students prepare for these important assessments by focusing on verbal skills like reading, writing and vocabulary. Students will develop valuable test-taking strategies to help improve their scores. This Reading and Writing section represents half of the ACT prep course experience, and consequently will represent one half of the student overall grade for the course.

• General Music

This course will give students the vocabulary, knowledge and analytical skills to identify music from contrasting periods, as well as introduce them to major masterworks outlined in the Mississippi Department of Education Framework. This class will explore different themes; music as a reflection of the political and social climate of culture, the causes/ reasons behind the progression and development of musical styles, and the influence of the composer's spiritual life on their music and the history of music as a whole.

• Creative Writing

The Creative Writing course will provide the student practices in the processes of composing poems, personal descriptive and narrative essays, and short fiction as well as other writing exercises. If time allows, the writing of drama may be pursued. The course affords an opportunity for self-expression, promotes critical thinking, expands the imagination, and develops the use of figurative and literal language. The student will pursue an independent project in creative writing. The student will become a critical reader and editor of his/her own work and the work of his/her classmates. The student will be required to submit works for publication. Students will leave with a portfolio of their writings as well as a published book of the class writings.

• Introduction to Drawing

This class will focus on the very core of fine art, drawing. Students will be observing from life and drawing in many different media and in many different sizes. They will learn the foundational techniques of sketching and composition and will then use those skills to create works of art.

Session II: June 14-June 26, 2015

• Introduction to Engineering

Introduction to Engineering is a unique projects-based course designed to give students an opportunity to evaluate their interest in engineering. Not only will students learn about what engineers do, they will also understand the differences in various types of engineering professions. Focus is given to civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, and geological engineering, as well as computer science. The highly emphasized problem-solving skills promoted in this course should be useful to both the engineering ad non-engineering bound students.

• Fantasy Fiction

20th Century Fantasy Fiction explores major authors and their works in the 1900s. Students will discuss major literary works such as The Hobbit and Harry Potter. We will focus on short stories and fairy tales, as well as the recent popularity of comic books. Students will journey to the movie theater in town to see how paper is brought to life in the world of fantasy fiction. From magic and mystery to swords and shields, students will journey through some of the 20th century's favorite tales.

• Introduction to Photography

Through delving into the workings of the camera and compositional techniques used to capture the perfect image, students will learn how to have that elusive "eye" of the artist. Students will also learn some of the ways they can use modern technology to augment and manipulate the photograph to suit their purpose using Adobe Photoshop. By the end of the course, the student will have learned the ways that they can turn photography into a career as a photojournalist, fine artist, or discovered a new and expressive hobby.

*Students must bring their own DSLR cameras for this course. A Cannon Rebel or comparable is recommended. CAMERAS WILL NOT BE PROVIDED FOR USE BY THE PROGRAM.

• Earth and Space Science

Explorations into Earth and Space Science is a beginner's look into the various aspects of the Earth. Topics of discussion will include composition of the Earth, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, fossils, earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountains.

Session III: July 5-July 17, 2015

• ACT Prep

The ACT (according to www.actstudent.org) is a national college admissions examination that consists of subject area tests in English, math, science, reading. The ACT Plus Writing includes the four subject area tests plus a 30-minute Writing Test. All 4-year colleges and universities in the U.S accept ACT results. The results from these tests must be included as part of applications for admission to most four-year colleges and universities. Because admissions are becoming increasingly competitive, good ACT test scores can give students an edge on the competition.

This course is designed to help students prepare for these important assessments by focusing on verbal skills like reading, writing and vocabulary. Students will develop valuable test-taking strategies to help improve their scores. This Reading and Writing section represents half of the ACT prep course experience, and consequently will represent one half of the student overall grade for the course.

• World Literature

World Literature will cover multiple genres such as short story, poetry, and plays. Students will analyze the works of major authors like William Shakespeare, Geoffrey Chaucer, Maya Angelou, the Bronte sisters, and others. Students will discuss the evolution of literature over time as we explore timeless classics and new bestsellers.

• Mississippi Backroads: A Course in Mississippi Local Culture

Information coming soon. Please check again later.

Cost

The cost for a residential student is $1000 per session; this includes tuition, housing, meals, and activities. The cost for a commuter is $500 per session and includes tuition and lunch daily. A one time registration fee of $50 is required to hold a spot for a student. This fee is required once a student has been admitted to the program.

Scholarships

Scholarships are only available to residential students. Commuting students are not eligible for scholarships. Scholarships are limited and are provided on a first come, first serve basis. Those eligible for scholarships are: returning students to the Summer Academy program (students who attended the program last summer), Ole Miss faculty/staff (whose child will be a residential student), and students who demonstrate a financial need, as well as, who have maintained a 3.5 GPA for their last three years of school. Scholarships are not stackable-only one scholarship per student is permitted. No full scholarships are available.

Students must first be admitted to the program before they may apply for a scholarship. Scholarship information, if needed, will be provided once a student has been accepted to the program.

Apply Here

Applications are only accepted online.  Papers applications are not available.  All communication for Summer Academy is done via email.  You must have an email address that is checked regularly in order to apply.  Application status, acceptance, or denial will be sent to the email address that is provided as the student’s email.  A non-refundable $25 application fee is required.  Please be prepared to pay this fee before submitting your application.  We accept Visa or Mastercard.  An application cannot be accepted until the fee is paid.   

Please allow two weeks for processing.  If an application is accepted, the student will receive notification via email with additional documents that must be filled out.  A registration fee of $50.00 is required to hold a student’s spot.  The additional required documents, as well as the $50.00 registration fee, is due in our office two weeks after acceptance to the program or the student’s spot will automatically be made available.

PLEASE NOTE:  Courses are filled on a first come, first serve basis.  Sixteen students are accepted to each course.  A course will be cancelled if less than twelve students enroll.  The application fee is non-refundable.  The registration fee minus $25 and the tuition will only be refunded if a course is cancelled.  Refunds are not given to students who do not attend or who leave the program early.

Apply Here

Questions? Contact us.

Questions? Contact us at summeracademy@olemiss.edu or 662-915-7621