Tracks and Classes

Designed for students with an interest in computers and technology. Students will have the opportunity to tour the Mississippi Center for Supercomputing Research (MCSR) and meet faculty of the Computer Science Department.

CSCI 111: Computer Science - Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

Elective - Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below.

Designed to expose high school students to a variety of engineering disciplines to assist them in making informed decisions about possible college majors. The program is designed for the exemplary high school student interested in applied mathematics, science, and technology. In addition to coursework, program participants will take field trips and participate in other Engineering activities.

Requirement: Minimum ACT Math subscore of 25 or better.

ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the problem-solving methods that engineers use when applying scientific principles for the creation of realistic solutions to everyday technical problems. Students should have a 20 or above on the ACT (or SAT equivalent).

OPTION 1 - MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

OPTION 2 - MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

The program of study in English not only enriches students’ appreciation of literature and engages them in cultural debate but helps develop crucial skills in analytical thinking and clear, persuasive expression both in speech and in writing. An English degree is an ideal gateway for careers that emphasize communication and critical thinking including law, business, journalism, public service, and education. Students choosing the English track will take two courses:

ENG 224: American Literature Since the Civil War

ENG 300: Introduction to Creative Writing

As part of their introduction to the English major, students will attend sessions at the University's annual Faulkner Conference, tour Faulkner's home, and meet with department faculty. Available only in Summer Session 2.

Designed for students with a career interest in a health-related profession such as nursing, medical assisting, laboratory tech, etc. The goal of the Program is to provide a base knowledge in human biology using one of the University's freshman biology courses, the accompanying lab, and a first aid course.

CHEM 101: Chemistry Concepts I. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry.

OPTION 1 - PSY 201: General Psychology. An introductory course into the field of psychology. This course will cover concepts related to individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

OPTION 2 - HP 203: First Aid and CPR. Safety instruction and practices in the methods as prescribed in the American Red Cross standard and advanced courses.

Engage in an eye-opening exploration into the different segments of the hospitality industry, including travel & tourism, hotels, restaurants, and cruises, just to name a few. Available only in Summer Session 2.

NHM 215: Introduction to Hospitality Management. This course will provide an overview of the hospitality industry from its beginnings to the projections for the future. It will provide an overview of the hospitality industry from its beginnings to the projections for the future.

NHM 208: Nutrition Science Lab (1 hour) Laboratory to accompany NHM 209, Nutrition Science.

NHM 209: Nutrition Science (3 hours) Introduction to the principles of the science of nutrition with applications to food selection for individuals of all ages.

Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is the coordination and integration of all marketing communication tools, avenues, functions, and sources within a company into a seamless program that maximizes the impact on consumers and other end users at a minimal cost.

IMC 104: Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication. Introduces the basic disciplines of IMC: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, database marketing, internet marketing communication, and relationship marketing.

IMC 205: Writing for Integrated Marketing Communication. This course focuses on developing students' skills in accurate, forceful, vivid and persuasive writing to advance a variety of IMC strategies.

Designed for students who are interested in topics critical to national security, to exploring new cultures and languages, and solving challenging analytic questions. The goal of the program is to provide students with an overview of the Intelligence Community. Available only in Summer Session 2.

ISS 125 - Introduction to Intelligence Studies - Students will receive a broad overview of intelligence gathering and analysis as practiced by agencies of the United States government, to include its purpose, history and potential benefits. The organizational makeup of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC); the laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and employment/internship possibilities in the IC will also be presented. Finally, students will be given an introduction to analytical procedures and writing/briefing for policymakers.

POL 103: Introduction to International Relations. This course will focus on factors determining the conduct of international relations; foreign policy objectives and methods of achieving them; power politics versus collective security.

International Students Only. Designed for students looking to improve their academic English speaking and writing abilities. Students will enroll in two Intensive English Program (IEP) courses and will be tested for course placement upon arrival. Instruction in Speaking & Listening, Reading, Writing and Grammar are given at 5 different instruction levels: Beginning, Intermediate, High Intermediate, Advanced, Advanced Plus. All courses incorporate modern technologies that assist in language learning, and students have opportunities to utilize the computer labs in the University’s Language Resource Center.

The Intensive English Program also specializes in the design and implementation of programs to meet the curricular needs of specialized groups. Customized group programs are typically short term, for either one or two summer sessions. A minimum of 10 participants is required.

Design for students interested to improve their Spanish proficiency.

SPAN 111: Intensive Elementary Spanish. Spanish 101 and 102 in one semester; reading, writing, and conversational skills for basic communication. Goal is to develop proficiency in Spanish, with cultural information about the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 211: Intensive Intermediate Spanish. (Must have successfully completed SPAN 111) Spanish 201 and 202 in one semester. Goal is to develop continuing proficiency in Spanish, with cultural information about the Spanish-speaking world.

In addition to offering SPAN 111 in both Summer College terms, we will offer SPAN 211, Intensive Intermediate Spanish, during the second term. In order to take 211, a student MUST complete 111. Thus, students can earn 12 hours of credit in Spanish if they attend BOTH sessions of Summer College, but may attend either session if they are seeking just 6 hours of freshman level credit.

An attempt will be made to pair all participating students with a native Spanish speaker participating in the Intensive English Program to aid both students in their studies and provide additional opportunities outside the classroom to use their new language skills.

Designed for students who would like to learn French. There are no prerequisites for this course, so any student who is admitted to SCHS can enroll in this program.

FR 111: Intensive Elementary French. French 101 and 102 in one semester. This class will develop proficiency in French, with cultural information about the French-speaking world.

FR 211: Intensive Intermediate French. (Must have successfully completed FR 111) French 201 and 202 in one semester. This class will develop continuing proficiency in French, with cultural information about the French-speaking world.

In addition to offering FR 111 in both Summer College terms, we will offer FR 211, Intensive Intermediate French, during the second term. In order to take 211, a student MUST complete 111. Thus, students can earn 12 hours of credit in French if they attend BOTH sessions of Summer College, but may attend either session if they are seeking just 6 hours of freshman level credit.

The School of Journalism uses state-of-the-art facilities to train creative minds in multiple platforms in journalism. Participants learn about the role of media enterprises in a free society, are introduced to the evolution of the media today and participate in many exercises related to using the cutting-edge tools of media practitioners. Available only in Summer Session 2.

Jour 101 – An introduction to the impact and importance of media on society. This undergraduate course will help you develop media literacy skills and explore the development, structure, and functions of traditional and new media. We will examine the history, economics and other aspects of the media globally, and especially in the United States. The course will also give you an overview of communication professions, such as journalism, public relations, and advertising.

Jour 361 – What does "Black Mirror" reflect? Social media and tech in society “Black Mirror” is a British science-fiction anthology series set in the near future that explores the potential consequences of social media and future technology. Each episode has a different cast with a unique story and, like most science fiction, it offers a prophetic warning about what could happen if we lose control and allow technology to control us. Recognizing the show's potential as a discussion starter about modern and future media, students are asked to watch specific episodes of “Black Mirror." think critically about the program and through class discussion and writing exercises, they will envision the future of social media and technology. Some selected content will be hosted on our Black Mirror Project website. The class will also analyze topical developments and news stories related to the impact of social media on society.

LA 201: Introduction to Law. Survey of the development of the law in our society; an introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics.

Elective. Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below.

Available only in Summer Session 2.

While the other programs offered through the Summer College offer a specific focus, the Liberal Arts Program's focus can be whatever the student wishes it to be. It is particularly attractive to the student who has not settled into one specific area of study.

Select four options for a first and second course from the list below.

Students will choose a course from this list if they enroll in a program that has room for an elective (indicated in description above). Students wishing to enroll in the Liberal Arts Program will select two courses from this list. When applying, please select 3-4 elective courses. Students will be enrolled in their selected courses, if available, at time of enrollment.

ECON 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 hrs; offered in both terms): The nature of economics, economic concepts, and institutions; the role of the price system in directing the production of goods and services; distribution of income; and comparative economic systems.

HST 120: History of Europe to 1648 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Introduction to European history from the Classical era to 1648.

HST 121: History of Europe since 1648 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Introduction to European history since 1648.

HST 130: United States to 1877 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Political, cultural, social, and economic development.

HST 131: United States since 1877 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Political, cultural, social, and economic development.

MATH 121: College Algebra (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Presents linear, quadratic, higher-order, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic equations; as well as linear, polynomial, and rational inequalities. Other topics include the algebra of functions, their graphs, and solving systems of equations in two variables.

MUS 103: Music Appreciation (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Study of elementary music elements and basic terminology; emphasis on identification of major music styles of Western civilization.

PHIL 103: Logic (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Principles and methods of sound reasoning, emphasizing analysis of everyday arguments.

POL 101: Intro to American Politics (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Constitutional principles of U.S. governmental framework. Political participation, electoral processes, political institutions.

PSY 201: General Psychology (3 hrs; offered in second term only): Introduction: individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

REL 101: Intro to Religion (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Survey of religion and of the major world religions.

SOC 101: Intro to Sociology (3 hrs; offered in first term only): Concepts and methods necessary for studying society.

SPCH 102: Fundamentals of Public Speaking (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Fundamentals of organizing, preparing, and delivering speeches in a variety of public forums.

PACE (Promoting Academic and Creative Excellence) was initiated in 1980 and has helped hundreds of students become critical thinkers, problem solvers, and communicators. Accepted program participants will enroll in Honors 100 PACE Seminar. The theme for the course this summer will be “Revolutions & Reforms: The Arab Spring.” PACE is available in Summer Session One only.

This introduction to Middle Eastern Studies will focus on the geography, politics and culture of the Middle East, with special attention paid to the revolutions that took place throughout the region in 2011. Students will learn about factors that precipitated the popular uprisings in Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain and Syria. Using popular cartoons, media, and other resources, students will gain a better understanding of why the revolutions occurred and how these dynamics have shaped the region today.

The skills emphasized in the course prepare the student for participation in seminar courses such as those offered by the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College. In addition, PACE students take one other 3-hour course of their choosing (students may select any course listed under the Liberal Arts Program track as their second course selection). Students who choose to attend the University of Mississippi and are admitted to the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College will be able to count the 3-hour PACE course toward their total required Honors College hours.

In partnership with the School of Pharmacy, rising seniors have the opportunity to get a glimpse of the pharmacy field inside and outside the classroom. Available only in Summer Session 2.

Requirements: Minimum 3.5 GPA and 24 composite ACT (or SAT equivalent).

CHEM 101: I Chemistry Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry.

MATH 115: Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics; probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; and linear regression.

Students will have some site trips which will expose students to different areas of pharmacy and a pharmacy project.

Designed for high school students with an interest in the study of the mind and behavior and potential careers related to the field of psychology. The goals of the program are to (1) provide an introduction to the field of psychology and the college experience and (2) to provide an understanding of what majoring in psychology involves and the multiple careers a degree in psychology can prepare students to pursue. In addition to coursework, students will participate in other Psychology-related activities. Available only in Summer Session 1.

PSY 201: General Psychology Introduction: individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

Elective. Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below