Programs and Classes

Designed for students with an interest in computers and technology. Students will have the opportunity to tour the Mississippi Center for Supercomputing Research (MCSR) and meet faculty of the Computer Science Department.

CSCI 111: Computer Science - Introduction to computer science with emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development. Using high-level, block-structured programming language, students design, implement, debug, test, and document computer programs for various applications.

Elective - Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below.

Designed to expose high school students to a variety of engineering disciplines to assist them in making informed decisions about possible college majors. The program is designed for the exemplary high school student interested in applied mathematics, science, and technology. In addition to coursework, program participants will take field trips and participate in other Engineering activities.

Requirement: Minimum ACT Math subscore of 25 or better.

ENGR 100: Introduction to Engineering. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the problem-solving methods that engineers use when applying scientific principles for the creation of realistic solutions to everyday technical problems. Students should have a 20 or above on the ACT (or SAT equivalent).

OPTION 1 - MATH 125: Basic Mathematics for Science & Engineering.  (Students with a 20-24 on the ACT or SAT equivalent should take this: A unified freshman course designed especially for those students requiring a review of both algebra and trigonometry before beginning the calculus sequence.

OPTION 2 - MATH 261: Unified Calculus & Analytic Geometry 1. (Students with a 25 or above on the ACT or SAT equivalent should take this) Differential and integral calculus; analytic geometry introduced, covered in integrated plan where appropriate. Four-term sequence for engineering and science majors.

Designed for students with a career interest in a health-related profession such as nursing, medical assisting, laboratory tech, etc. The goal of the Program is to provide a base knowledge in human biology using one of the University's freshman biology courses, the accompanying lab, and a first aid course.

BISC 102: Inquiry into Life - Human Biology. A survey course intended for non-biology majors, introducing basic principles and emphasizing the function of the human body, including diseases, cellular process, respiration, muscular system, reproduction, development, immunity, and inheritance.

BISC 103: Inquiry into Life - Lab. Laboratory supplement to BISC 102.

HP 203: First Aid and CPR. Safety instruction and practices in the methods as prescribed in the American Red Cross standard and advanced courses.

Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is the coordination and integration of all marketing communication tools, avenues, functions, and sources within a company into a seamless program that maximizes the impact on consumers and other end users at a minimal cost.

IMC 204: Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication. Introduces the basic disciplines of IMC: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, database marketing, internet marketing communication, and relationship marketing.

IMC 205: Writing for Integrated Marketing Communication. This course focuses on developing students' skills in accurate, forceful, vivid and persuasive writing to advance a variety of IMC strategies.

Information regarding this program will be available in Spring 2018. Please see www.ciss.olemiss.edu for program details.

International Students Only. It is primarily designed for students looking to improve their English speaking or writing abilities. Students will enroll in two Intensive English Program (IEP) course. Participants are tested for course placement upon arrival. The second course is a content course selected by the student. Examples of content courses include Topics in American Culture, Conversation, and Pronunciation.

The Intensive English Program (IEP) offers credit-bearing academic English courses from basic to advanced levels with a curriculum designed to prepare students to interact in the English-speaking academic, social, and professional world.

The IEP at the University of Mississippi offers five different levels of intensive English language instruction: Beginning, Intermediate, High Intermediate, Advanced, Advanced Plus.
Students receive instruction in the four skill areas: Speaking & Listening, Reading, Writing, and Grammar. Additionally, content courses are offered based on student needs. All courses incorporate modern technologies that assist in language learning, and students have opportunities to utilize the computer labs in the University’s Language Resource Center.

The Intensive English Program also specializes in the design and implementation of programs to meet the curricular needs of specialized groups. Customized group programs are typically short term, for either one or two summer sessions. A minimum of 10 participants is required.

An attempt will be made to pair all participating students with a native Spanish speaker participating in the Intensive English Program to aid both students in their studies and provide additional opportunities outside the classroom to use their new language skills.

In addition to offering SPAN 111 in both Summer College terms, we will offer SPAN 211, Intensive Intermediate Spanish, during the second term. In order to take 211, a student MUST complete 111. Thus, students can earn 12 hours of credit in Spanish if they attend BOTH sessions of Summer College, but may attend either session if they are seeking just 6 hours of freshman level credit.

SPAN 111: Intensive Elementary Spanish. Spanish 101 and 102 in one semester; reading, writing, and conversational skills for basic communication. Goal is to develop proficiency in Spanish, with cultural information about the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 211: Intensive Intermediate Spanish. (Must have successfully completed SPAN 111) Spanish 201 and 202 in one semester. Goal is to develop continuing proficiency in Spanish, with cultural information about the Spanish-speaking world.

Designed for students who would like to study French. There are no prerequisites for this course, so any student who is admitted to SCHS can enroll in this program.

In addition to offering FR 111 in both Summer College terms, we will offer FR 211, Intensive Intermediate French, during the second term. In order to take 211, a student MUST complete 111. Thus, students can earn 12 hours of credit in French if they attend BOTH sessions of Summer College, but may attend either session if they are seeking just 6 hours of freshman level credit.

FR 111: Intensive Elementary French. French 101 and 102 in one semester. This class will develop proficiency in French, with cultural information about the French-speaking world.

FR 211: Intensive Intermediate French. (Must have successfully completed FR 111) French 201 and 202 in one semester. This class will develop continuing proficiency in French, with cultural information about the French-speaking world.

The School of Journalism uses state-of-the-art facilities to train creative minds in multiple platform journalism. Participants learn about the role of media enterprises in a free society, are introduced to the evolution of the media today and participate in many exercises related to using the cutting edge tools of media practitioners.

JOUR 101: Introduction to Mass Communication. An introduction to media platforms (newspapers, magazines, television, radio, social media) and media practices (writing news, sports and features, public relations and advertising). Emphasis is on the role of and the impact of media on modern society.

OPTION 1 - IMC 204: Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication. Introduces the basic disciplines of IMC: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, database marketing, internet marketing communication, and relationship marketing

OPTION 2 - IMC 205: Writing for Integrated Marketing Communication. This course focuses on developing students' skills in accurate, forceful, vivid and persuasive writing to advance a variety of IMC strategies.

LA 201: Introduction to Law. Survey of the development of the law in our society; an introduction to legal terminology and reasoning, substantive areas of the law, the legal profession, the paralegal profession, and legal ethics.

Elective. Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below.

While the other programs offered through the Summer College offer a specific focus, the Liberal Arts Program's focus can be whatever the student wishes it to be. It is particularly attractive to the student who has not settled into one specific area of study.

Elective. Select four options for a first and second course from the Elective Course List below.

Project PACE is the father of all our Summer College programs.  PACE (Promoting Academic and Creative Excellence) was initiated in 1980 and has helped hundreds of students become critical thinkers, problem solvers, and communicators.  Accepted program participants will enroll in Honors 100 PACE Seminar.  This 3-hour course is based on Greek literature as a means for exploring the philosophical roots of western man.  By looking at Greek (and Roman) mythology, early Greek drama, and Greek philosophy, students will discover the origin of most thought systems in western culture.  They will master the factual information of the course, but they will extend their learning to look at modern societal problems and to propose solutions.  The skills emphasized in the course prepare the student for participation in seminar courses such as those offered by the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College.  In addition, PACE students take one other 3-hour course of their choosing (students may select any course listed under the Liberal Arts Program during the term they plan to attend as their second course selection).  Students who choose to attend the University of Mississippi and are admitted to the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College will be able to count the 3-hour PACE course toward their total required Honors College hours.

Requirement: Minimum 3.50 unweighted GPA.

CLC 100: Introduction to Classics. This three-hour course employs ancient Greek texts to explore enduring questions about who we are as individuals and as members of society. We will investigate the extraordinary content of Greek creation myths, Athenian drama, and some conversations of Socrates, the ancient gadfly of Athens (as written by Plato) and study how the authors of these texts addressed questions and issues that we still discuss today. Acquisition of new knowledge will be addressed through reading quizzes and tests; analytic skills and awareness of literary and dramatic practices as well as of rhetorical and philosophical habits will be developed through examination and interrogation of the daily readings; interpretation and application of the ideas and ways of thinking/discussing will take form in various written and oral exercises. Skills emphasized in the course prepare the student for participation in seminar courses such as those offered by the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College.

Elective. Select two options for a second course from the Elective Course List below.

The Summer College for High School Students Program is excited to announce a partnership with the School of Pharmacy.  Now rising seniors in high school will have the opportunity to come to campus early and get a taste of what it’s like to be a pharmacy student inside and outside the classroom.

Requirements: Minimum 3.5 GPA and 24 composite ACT (or SAT equivalent).

CHEM 101: I Chemistry Concepts. Introduction to the basic concepts and mathematical tools needed to study and understand basic chemistry.

MATH 115: Elementary Statistics. Descriptive statistics; probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; and linear regression. 

The final academic component of the program will be some site trips, which will expose students to different areas of pharmacy and a pharmacy project.

* Additional course fees may be added to your Bursar account and will not be reflected in your cost estimate. Please estimate $150-200 for fees.

SCHS Elective Courses

Students will choose a course from this list if they enroll in a program that has room for an elective (indicated in description above); student wishing to enroll in the Liberal Arts Program will select two from this list. When applying, please select 3-4 elective courses. Students will be enrolled in their selected courses, if available, at time of enrollment.

ECON 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 hrs; offered in both terms): The nature of economics, economic concepts, and institutions; the role of the price system in directing the production of goods and services; distribution of income; and comparative economic systems.

HIS 101: History of Europe to 1648 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Introduction to European history from the Classical era to 1648.

HIS 102: History of Europe since 1648 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Introduction to European history since 1648.

HIS 105: United States to 1877 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Political, cultural, social, and economic development.

HIS 106: United States since 1877 (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Political, cultural, social, and economic development.

MATH 121: College Algebra (3 hrs; offered in both terms): College algebra.

MUS 103: Music Appreciation (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Study of elementary music elements and basic terminology; emphasis on identification of major music styles of Western civilization.

PHIL 103: Logic (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Principles and methods of sound reasoning, emphasizing analysis of everyday arguments.

POL 101: Intro to American Politics (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Constitutional principles of U.S. governmental framework. Political participation, electoral processes, political institutions.

PSY 201: General Psychology (3 hrs; offered in second term only): Introduction: individual development, motivation, emotion, motor function, sensory and neural functions, intelligence, learning, perceiving, thinking, social behavior, and personality.

REL 101: Intro to Religion (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Survey of religion and of the major world religions.

SOC 101: Intro to Sociology (3 hrs; offered in first term only): Concepts and methods necessary for studying society.

SPCH 102: Fundamentals of Public Speaking (3 hrs; offered in both terms): Fundamentals of organizing, preparing, and delivering speeches in a variety of public forums.