WRIT 210 Rhetoric I: Foundations to 1650

WRIT 210 IS Sec 1, University of Mississippi
[See UM Catalog for Description]

3 credit hours

Instructor Information:

Dr. Alice Myatt

Instructor name:
Dr. Alice Myatt, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair of Writing & Rhetoric

Instructor Information:
PHD, English: Georgia State University/ Atlanta, Georgia

Contact Information:

If you have questions concerning the content of the course, you may contact the instructor directly using the Email Your Instructor link in the Lessons or Content page. NOTE: Whenever sending email, please be sure to indicate your course title and number in the subject line.

For lesson or test administration issues, please contact the iStudy department:

The University of Mississippi
Division of Outreach and Continuing Education
iStudy
P. O. Box 1848
University, MS 38677

Phone: (662) 915-7313, toll-free (877) 915-7313
Fax: (662) 915-8826
E-mail: istudy@olemiss.edu

Course Description

WRIT 210: Rhetoric I – Ancient through Renaissance surveys the history of rhetoric from ancient through Renaissance periods. The course considers how ancient and classical rhetoric continues to influence contemporary discourse. Students examine how core concepts such the five canons of rhetoric, the work of Aristotle and Cicero, and the models of civic responsibility encouraged by Quintilius are foundational to the fabric of modern discourse.

Why study ancient rhetoric? In ancient times, rhetoric played a key role in the birth of our traditions of democratic politics and law. In modern times, classical rhetoric has been revived to guide us in analyzing the persuasive discourse around us and to make our own discourse more persuasive.

In this course, you will learn concepts from classical rhetoric and apply them to analyze and to produce contemporary discourse in your society, culture, media, institutions, communities, and personal lives. Students have been studying classical rhetoric for more than two millennia, starting with the ancient Greeks, and it continues to influence Western understanding of rhetoric. Classical rhetoric offers us guidelines for how to be persuasive.

In ancient times, rhetoric played a key role in the birth of our traditions of democratic politics and law. In modern times, classical rhetoric has been revived to guide us in analyzing the persuasive discourse around us and to make our own discourse more persuasive.

In this course, you will develop your ability to:

  • understand concepts of classical rhetoric
  • apply concepts of classical rhetoric to analyze contemporary discourse
  • produce persuasive written discourse of their own
  • deliver persuasive, action-oriented oral compositions.

By the end of the course, you will have developed your sensitivity to the power and persuasiveness in others’ discourse and will become more empowered and persuasive in your own written and spoken discourse.

Textbook Information:

Textbook information will be provided upon enrollment in your iStudy course.

Course Objectives:

By the end of the course, you should be able to do the following:

  1. Explain and apply core rhetorical concepts in the fields of writing and discourse studies
  2. Read and listen critically, in order to identify and interpret the formal, rhetorical, and stylistic features of a spoken or written discourse
  3. Show skill in writing and speaking that demonstrates competency in rhetorical conventions
  4. Draw on rhetorical sources to use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Demonstrate audience awareness by reflecting on the ways in which rhetorical modes have shaped their attitudes toward diverse audiences and cultures

Course Outline:

This course consists of 12 instructional modules (or lessons) and 2 proctored exams.

You MUST take the syllabus quiz within 2 weeks of enrolling or you will be dropped from the course. NOTE: you must pass the Syllabus and Orientation Quiz for the course materials to appear on the Lessons page.

LESSON

Reading Assignments

Due for Grades

Pacing guide to complete the course in a semester

Syllabus

*You MUST complete the syllabus quiz as soon as you have access to your Blackboard course. This is mandatory to verify your attendance.* NOTE: you must pass the Syllabus and Orientation Quiz for the course materials to appear on the Lessons page.

Syllabus Quiz

Week 1

1

Why Study Ancient Rhetorics?

  • Crowley: Chapter 1
  • Pullman: Introduction
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 1

2

Kairos and the Rhetorical Situation

  • Crowley: Chapter 2
  • Pullman: No reading this unit
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 2

3

Stasis

  • Crowley: Chapter 3
  • Pullman: pp. 143-149; 167-172 (stop at Arrangement)
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 3

4

Available Means: Common Topics and Commonplaces

  • Crowley: Chapter 4
  • Pullman: pp. 108 - 112 (stop at Dialectic); pp. 134 (begin at Topics) - 142; pp. 157 - 166
  • Digital course pack items
  • Information about Major Project 5

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 4

5

Logical Proof

  • Crowley: Chapter 5 and 6
  • Pullman: Chapters 1 and part of 2 (pp. 49 - 71)

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise
& essay

Week 5

6

Ethical Proof

  • Crowley: Chapter 7 and 8
  • Pullman: Chapters 2 (pp. 72 - 107) and 4 (pp. 228 - 248)
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 6

Midterm Exam

This proctored and password-protected exam covers lessons 1-6. You must complete the History of Rhetoric Timeline chart BEFORE the midterm will open.

To be scheduled
and completed
before proceeding

Week 7

MIDPOINT OF COURSE

If you are a semester student, you must reach the midpoint of your course by the date specified in your information.
If you are a Flex UM student, you CANNOT WITHDRAW from this course after the exam has been submitted.

All lesson assignments or exams needed to reach the midpoint of the course 

The exact date semester students are required to reach the midpoint is specified in your information.

7

Pathetic Proof

  • Crowley: Chapter 9 and 10
  • Pullman: Chapter 3, pp. 108 - 111 (stop at Invention) AND pp. 172 - 197 (stop at Memory)
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 8

8

Extrinsic Proofs

  • Crowley: Chapter 11 and 12
  • Pullman: pp. 197 - 210
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 9

9

Arrangement

  • Read about Major Project 4 and Major Project 5 in the Additional Resources area
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise (proposals for Major Projects 4 and 5)

Week 10

10

Composition and Ornament

  • Crowley: none this lesson
  • Pullman: none this lesson
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 12

Persuasive Speech Project

This must be completed before you can schedule your final exam.

Blackboard dropbox

 

11

Imitation

  • Crowley: none this lesson
  • Pullman: none this lesson
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Week 13

12

Delivery and Memory

  • Crowley: none this lesson
  • Pullman: none this lesson
  • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz

Week 14

Final Project

This project may be started after Lesson 4 and will be due 1 week before the final exam.

Blackboard dropbox

 

Final Exam

This proctored and password-protected essay exam covers the whole course.

To be scheduled
and completed
to finalize credit

Week 15

Grading:

Grading Scale:
93 - 100% = A
90 - 92% = A-
87 - 89% = B+
83- 86% = B
80 - 82% = B-
77-79% = C+
73-76% = C
70-72% = C-
65-69% = D
Below 65% = F

FAILURE TO TAKE THE FINAL EXAM WILL RESULT IN FAILURE OF THE COURSE.

You must submit the lessons required to take the course exam(s). Lessons required but not submitted will receive a grade of zero. For the final exam, all coursework must be submitted and graded.