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WRIT 210: Rhetoric I – Ancient through Renaissance, v1

University of Mississippi
3 credit hours

Instructor Information:

 

Instructor name:

Dr. Alice Myatt, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair of Writing & Rhetoric

Instructor Information:

PHD, English: Georgia State University/ Atlanta, Georgia

Contact Information:

If you have questions concerning the content of the course, you may contact the instructor directly using the Email Your Instructor link in the Lessons or Content page. NOTE: Whenever sending email, please be sure to indicate your course title and number in the subject line. You can expect a response within 72 hours, although it may be longer on weekends. Many instructors reply within 24 hours.

For lesson or test administration issues, please contact the iStudy department:

The University of Mississippi
Division of Outreach and Continuing Education
iStudy
P. O. Box 1848
University, MS 38677

Phone: (662) 915-7313, toll-free (877) 915-7313
Fax: (662) 915-8826
E-mail: istudy@olemiss.edu

Course Description

WRIT 210: Rhetoric I – Ancient through Renaissance surveys the history of rhetoric from ancient through Renaissance periods. The course considers how ancient and classical rhetoric continues to influence contemporary discourse. Students examine how core concepts such the five canons of rhetoric, the work of Aristotle and Cicero, and the models of civic responsibility encouraged by Quintilius are foundational to the fabric of modern discourse.
Why study ancient rhetoric? In ancient times, rhetoric played a key role in the birth of our traditions of democratic politics and law. In modern times, classical rhetoric has been revived to guide us in analyzing the persuasive discourse around us and to make our own discourse more persuasive.

In this course, you will learn concepts from classical rhetoric and apply them to analyze and to produce contemporary discourse in your society, culture, media, institutions, communities, and personal lives. Students have been studying classical rhetoric for more than two millennia, starting with the ancient Greeks, and it continues to influence Western understanding of rhetoric. Classical rhetoric offers us guidelines for how to be persuasive.
In ancient times, rhetoric played a key role in the birth of our traditions of democratic politics and law. In modern times, classical rhetoric has been revived to guide us in analyzing the persuasive discourse around us and to make our own discourse more persuasive.
In this course, you will develop your ability to:

  • understand concepts of classical rhetoric
  • apply concepts of classical rhetoric to analyze contemporary discourse
  • produce persuasive written discourse of their own
  • deliver persuasive, action-oriented oral compositions.
By the end of the course, you will have developed your sensitivity to the power and persuasiveness in others’ discourse and will become more empowered and persuasive in your own written and spoken discourse.
Textbook Information:
 

Crowley, Sharon, and Debra Hawhee. Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, 5th ed. Pearson, 2012. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2013. (used from $20.00, Amazon)

ISBN: 978-0205175482

 

Pullman, George. Persuasion: History, Theory, Practice. Hackett, 2013. (around $23 on amazon.com used) ISBN: 9781603849982

 

Digital Course Readings as identified in the course are included in Blackboard. Recommended for additional reading:

  • Heinrichs, Jay. Thank you for arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can teach us about the art of persuasion. Three Rivers Press, 2013, paperback, ISBN: 978-0-385-34775-4

It is your responsibility to order your textbook. Online textbook retailers such as Amazon.com, ABEbooks.com, or Half.com usually provide used textbooks at economical prices.

Use the ISBN number to make sure you are ordering the exact book(s) required in this syllabus.

Course Objectives:

By the end of the course, you should be able to do the following:

  1. Explain and apply core rhetorical concepts in the fields of writing and discourse studies
  2. Read and listen critically, in order to identify and interpret the formal, rhetorical, and stylistic features of a spoken or written discourse
  3. Show skill in writing and speaking that demonstrates competency in rhetorical conventions
  4. Draw on rhetorical sources to use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  5. Demonstrate audience awareness by reflecting on the ways in which rhetorical modes have shaped their attitudes toward diverse audiences and cultures
Course Outline:

This course consists of 12 instructional modules (or lessons).

LESSON

Reading Assignments

Due for Grades

Syllabus

You MUST take the syllabus quiz within 2 weeks of enrolling or you will be dropped from the course. NOTE: you must pass the Syllabus and Orientation Quiz for the course materials to appear on the Lessons page.

Syllabus Quiz

1

Why Study Ancient Rhetorics?

    • Crowley: Chapter 1
    • Pullman: Introduction
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

2

Kairos and the Rhetorical Situation

    • Crowley: Chapter 2
    • Pullman: No reading this unit
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

3

Stasis

    • Crowley: Chapter 3
    • Pullman: pp. 143-149; 167-172 (stop at Arrangement)
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

4

Available Means: Common Topics and Commonplaces

    • Crowley: Chapter 4
    • Pullman: pp. 108 - 112 (stop at Dialectic); pp. 134 (begin at Topics) - 142; pp. 157 - 166
    • Digital course pack items
    • Information about Major Project 5

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

5

Logical Proof

    • Crowley: Chapter 5 and 6
    • Pullman: Chapters 1 and part of 2 (pp. 49 - 71)

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise & essay

6

Ethical Proof

    • Crowley: Chapter 7 and 8
    • Pullman: Chapters 2 (pp. 72 - 107) and 4 (pp. 228 - 248)
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Midterm Exam

This proctored and password-protected exam covers lessons 1-6. You must complete the History of Rhetoric Timeline chart BEFORE the midterm will open.

To be scheduled and completed before proceeding

7

Pathetic Proof

    • Crowley: Chapter 9 and 10
    • Pullman: Chapter 3, pp. 108 - 111 (stop at Invention) AND pp. 172 - 197 (stop at Memory)
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

8

Extrinsic Proofs

    • Crowley: Chapter 11 and 12
    • Pullman: pp. 197 - 210
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

9

Arrangement

    • Read about Major Project 4 and Major Project 5 in the Additional Resources area
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise (proposals for Major Projects 4 and 5)

10

Composition and Ornament

    • Crowley: none this lesson
    • Pullman: none this lesson
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

Persuasive Speech Project

This must be completed before you can schedule your final exam.

Blackboard dropbox

11

Imitation

    • Crowley: none this lesson
    • Pullman: none this lesson
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz, progymnasmata exercise

12

Delivery and Memory

    • Crowley: none this lesson
    • Pullman: none this lesson
    • Digital course pack items

Course journal, discussion board, reading quiz

Final Project

This project may be started after Lesson 4 and will be due 1 week before the final exam.

Blackboard dropbox

Final Exam

This proctored and password-protected essay exam covers the whole course.

To be scheduled and completed to finalize credit

Grading:

GRADING SCALE

93 - 100% = A
90 - 92% = A-
87 - 89% = B+
83- 86% = B
80 - 82% = B-
77-79% = C+
73-76% = C
70-72% = C-
65-69% = D
Below 65% = F

GRADING INFORMATION:

The grading format is as follows:

Major Project 1: Reading journal, discussion boards, and quizzes: 25%
Major Project 2: Progymnasmata Exercises: 15%
Major Project 3: Historical Timeline Project: 5%
Midterm Exam: 10%
Major Project 4: Persuasive Speech Video: 15%
Major Project 5: Final Project: 15%
Final Exam: 15%

FAILURE TO PASS THE FINAL EXAM WILL RESULT IN FAILURE OF THE COURSE.

Testing Information

A student who wishes to receive credit for an Independent Study course must take all required exams under the supervision of an approved test site official (a proctor). iStudy has a testing facility (DETL, the Distance Education Testing Center at UM) to proctor tests for students in the Oxford area. Students near Tupelo, Southaven, Grenada or Booneville can use our regional campus testing centers. Other students are allowed to take tests from any approved 2 or 4 year college or university. Testing centers and public libraries can also serve as proctors, but K-12 schools are not acceptable. More information is available on the iStudy website. If you are testing in Oxford, you need to submit a test application via Register Blast. The link to Register Blast can be found at the iStudy website. If you are not testing in Oxford, you need to submit an online test application via the iStudy website.

NOTE:

  • It is your responsibility to contact a proctor and schedule a testing appointment for each and every test you are required to take.
  • It is your responsibility to provide iStudy with your proctor information at least seven (7) days before the examination window opens.
  • If you are unable to use one of the proctors on the list, you are still responsible for locating a proctor for each and every test.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

In an Independent Study course, a student's reading comprehension and written communication skills become even more important than in traditional lecture courses because they are the primary means of receiving knowledge and demonstrating mastery of that knowledge. Accordingly, reading comprehension and written communication skills are necessary for success in this course.

NOTE: after you've submitted a quiz, you can view the results by first accessing the quiz as you did before and then clicking the "OK" button in the bottom right corner when prompted.

Online Attendance Verification: The University requires that online students show active virtual participation as a substitute for physical presence. Active participation is evaluated by submission of a graded assignment within the first two weeks of the course. Simply logging in to Blackboard does not count. For iStudy, you can show engagement by taking the syllabus quiz. You will be dropped from the class if you fail to take the quiz by the end of the second week after enrollment. Once you complete the quiz with at least 80%, the rest of the course materials will become available to you.

Videos: Most lessons contain at least one video, so you'll need speakers or headphones and the download capacity to watch short videos.

Descriptions of Major Writing Assignments:

    1. Lesson Assignments:
      1. Reading Responses via Blackboard reading journal (15% of course grade) Each week, compose a 250-word response to questions about that week’s reading(s) in Persuasion. Post your response to your reading journal. (Ongoing)
      2. Reading Quizzes in Blackboard (10% of course grade) - quizzes will come from readings and videos (Ongoing)
      3. Progymnasmata Exercises: (15% of course grade) (Ongoing) From Ancient Rhetorics, students will complete one of progymnasmata exercises that accompany most of the chapters.
    2. Persuasive Speech (15% of final grade) using iMovie or other video recording platform in which you select a topic (approved by instructor via one-page proposal) that includes a call to action on the part of the audience. Final length: not more than 5 minutes. This will be due at the end of Lesson 12. This must be completed before you can schedule your final exam.
    3. Final Project on Historical Rhetorician: (20% of course grade) This project may be started after Lesson 4 and will be due 1 week before the final exam. This project will also be the basis for 2 student/instructor conferences using Skype, Zoom, or Hangouts. Whatever medium you work in, think of your final project as being equivalent in time commitment and substance to a carefully thought-out, well-written, and revised 8-10 page paper. When I evaluate your project, I will be considering how well you use your chosen medium, the quality and originality of your ideas and research, and how well you express these ideas.
    4. Midterm Exam (Proctored): (10% of course grade) - This will be due following Lesson 6.
    5. Final Exam (Proctored): (15% of course grade) This will be due following Lesson 12.Rewrite/Late Paper Policy I allow rewrites only of documents that receive C’s, D's or F's. C’s may be rewritten, however, B is the highest grade possible for those rewrites. Any rewrite must be accompanied by the original graded document. You must meet with me to discuss any document that you intend to rewrite. Documents that contain any plagiarized material will receive F's and cannot be rewritten for a higher grade.

Conferences: Meet with me when you have questions about an assignment, when you would like to try out some ideas before a document is due, when you have questions about a comment, or when you want to know where you stand in the course. I will meet with you online via Zoom, and I will be responsible for setting up the online meeting and inviting you to it. You should also talk to me to get help with particular writing-related problems or to resolve differences about grades. Finally, I am open to your suggestions for improving the course, so please discuss with me your ideas about how the course is going. If you cannot make my scheduled office hours and would like to meet with me, we can work together to find a convenient time for conferencing.

University Writing Center: Aside from one-on-one meetings with teachers during office hours, the best way to improve your writing is to work with writing consultants at one of the University’s Writing Centers. On the Oxford campus, the Writing Center is on the 3rd floor of Lamar Hall. Writing consultations may also be completed online via the WCOnline interface. Writing consultants will work with any student writer working on any project in any discipline. To learn more about Writing Center locations, hours, scheduling and services, please go to http://rhetoric.olemiss.edu/writing-centers/ Make contact with a Writing Center consultant early and often. Working with a writing consultant is easy, and you have access to face-to-face and online sessions. To make an appointment with a writing consultant, go to olemiss.mywconline.com and follow the instructions. You may also upload a draft of your paper once you have made the reservation for a session. If you want to see how an online session works, a how-to video is available for students.

Many successful students begin going to the Writing Center with their first essay and continue to do so over the course of a semester, making appointments with writing consultants for each essay they write. The goal of the Writing Center is to help students become better, independent writers, so the writing consultants don’t “proofread” or merely “correct” errors. Instead, they do something better – they will help you to brainstorm, talk about research and explore resources, and help you improve your editing strategies. Remember, online appointments are available. If you have questions about the Writing Center, use the LiveChat tool on our website to talk with someone in the writing center, call us at 662-915-7689, or send email to cwrwc@go.olemiss.edu.

J.D. Williams Library:
University librarians are available to help you find and evaluate sources for your papers. You can go to the library website at http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/and click on “Ask A Librarian” for help via live chat, email, and phone. Librarians are also available at the Reference Desk on the first floor in the Information Commons. Open tours of the library are also available during the semester if you'd like to take a guided tour. Information about tours can be found at http://www.libraries.olemiss.edu/uml/events-tours.

ADA AND STUDENT DISABILITY SERVICES:

The University of Mississippi is committed to the creation of inclusive learning environments for all students. If there are aspects of the instruction or design of this course that result in barriers to your full inclusion and participation or to accurate assessment of your achievement, please contact the course instructor as soon as possible. Barriers may include, but are not necessarily limited to, timed exams and in-class assignments, difficulty with the acquisition of lecture content, inaccessible web content or the use of non-captioned or non-transcribed video and audio files. Students must also contact Student Disability Services at 662-915-7128 so that office can:

    1. provide you with an Instructor Notification form
    2. facilitate the removal of barriers
    3. ensure you have equal access to the same opportunities for success that are available to all students

For more information, please visit their website at http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/sds.

M BOOK: ACADEMIC DISHONESTY / Plagiarism:

You should not share your private personal passwords (for your Blackboard account or for your email) with anyone else, including brothers or sisters, boyfriends or girlfriends, or parents. Logs of all your activity within the Blackboard course environment, including the Internet location from which you are accessing Blackboard, are available to the instructor and to the Independent Study office. Any evidence of logins to a student's Blackboard course by someone other than the student will be treated as an act of academic dishonesty and will result, at minimum, with failure in the course; the student may also be subject to the more severe disciplinary actions outlined in The University Policy on Academic Dishonesty. (ACA.AR.600.001)

Academic Dishonesty is expressly prohibited by The University of Mississippi. See The University of Mississippi's M Book. This includes plagiarism and self-plagiarism. Plagiarism is not only prohibited by the university but it could also be a legal offense (ex: copyright, infringement, fraud, etc.).

  • Self-plagiarism is defined as re-using a paper written for another class and submitting it in whole or part for credit in another class, without obtaining permission from the instructor prior to the submission of the paper.
  • Plagiarism is harder to define, but it boils down to representing someone else's ideas as your own.

To be absolutely clear, working with another person to answer submitted questions or any of the test questions is unacceptable. If it is determined that any student has violated this policy, the instructor will take the appropriate steps under The University of Mississippi's Academic Dishonesty policy. These range from failing the course to being suspended from The University of Mississippi.

If you have any questions about plagiarism please consult the web links below or contact the iStudy office.

SUGGESTIONS FOR INDEPENDENT STUDY STUDENTS:

Set aside a regular time for studying and preparing your lessons.

  • Submit the lessons at regular intervals.
  • Review constantly. Do not merely submit new material and permit the old to stagnate.
  • Note carefully the comments and corrected errors on the assignments that are returned to you. If you have difficulty understanding the corrections, never hesitate to ask for help.
  • Do not hesitate to contact your instructor about any difficulties you may have or any phase of the work you may not understand.

You can contact your instructor in one of these ways:

  1. Contact your instructor directly by using the Email Your Instructor link to send an email via Blackboard.
  2. Contact your instructor indirectly by sending a written message or email message (istudy@olemiss.edu) to the instructor in care of the iStudy department. Your message will be promptly forwarded to the instructor.

Do not let unanswered questions keep you from getting the maximum out of each lesson.

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